Training Programs

Save the Date for Post Traumatic Stress Management (PTSM) Training for School- and Community-Based Responders (click here for details). This training is ideal for school crisis team members, crisis counselors and resident assistance counselors in colleges and universities, as well as other youth-serving individuals from behavioral health centers, community and faith-based organizations and social service agencies who would like to learn more about providing crisis counseling after a suicide, homicide, accident or illness.

Save the Date for Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR) - Instructors: Patricia Watson, PhD, Robert Macy PhD (click here for details). Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR) is an evidence-informed modular approach to help children, adolescents, adults, and families in the months and years after a traumatic exposure including disasters and terrorism. This will be a two-day intensive seminar and seating will be limited. SPR is designed to help survivors acquire skills to reduce ongoing distress and effectively cope with post-incident stresses and adversities. Principles and techniques of Skills for Psychological Recovery meet four basic standards. They are: (1) consistent with research evidence on risk and resilience following trauma; (2) applicable and practical in field settings; (3) appropriate for developmental levels across the lifespan; and (4) culturally informed and delivered in a flexible manner.

TLC Staff Development Workshops Available for Schools and Communities

In addition to our regional and statewide trainings, TLC continues to offer workshops for schools and communities. These workshops can be customized to meet the needs of the requesting organization. 

All workshops are provided by TLC trainers who are experienced clinicians working with youth, educators, and service providers in a variety of settings including schools, social service programs, juvenile justice facilities, faith based organizations, etc. Several trainers also have experience as school administrators and bring that particular perspective to the trainings.

The following are workshop offerings:

  • Preventing Youth Suicide: Awareness Training or teachers, parents, and non-mental health personnel
  • Suicide Assessment Training for Clinicians and Counselors
  • Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST)For educators, law enforcement, mental health professionals, clergy, medical professionals, administrators, volunteers, and anyone else who might be interested in adding suicide intervention to their list of skills
  • After a Suicide – Guidelines for Schools
  • An Introduction to Evidence Based and Best Practice Suicide Prevention Programs for Schools
  • Depression in Children and Adolescents
  • Using the School I&RS Team to Support Students with Mental Illness
  • Schools and Mental Health-Bridging the Gap in Treating the Whole Child
  • Understanding Trauma and Loss in Youth
  • Helping a Grieving Child
  • Managing Trauma and Loss in Schools For Administrators, and Crisis Teams
  • Enhancing Your School’s Crisis Plan
  • Creating Safe and Respectful Environments
  • Working with Resistant Teens
  • Stress, Burnout and Vicarious Trauma

For more information on these training programs contact Donna Amundson at
732-235-2818.

The following programs, the Chronological Assessment of Suicide Events (CASE Approach); Post Traumatic Stress Management (PTSM); Advanced PTSM in Suicide Response Protocols; Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR); Classroom Based Psychosocial Intervention (CBI) and Traumatic Incident Intervention (TII),are offered statewide each academic year. Watch the TLC website for training dates and venues.

CASE Approach (Chronological Assessment of Suicide Events)

Course Description

This half-day workshop provides front-line counselors and clinicians in schools and communities with an overview of the state of the art skills necessary to tackle one of the most difficult clinical situations facing them: gathering valid data about ideation, plan and intent during a suicide assessment. The first workshop is devoted to understanding five practical validity techniques: the behavioral incident, shame attenuation, gentle assumption, symptom amplification and denial of the specific - the cornerstones for effectively eliciting suicidal ideation and other sensitive material. The second workshop is devoted to a demonstration of how these validity techniques can be woven into a specific strategy for eliciting suicidal ideation – the Chronological Assessment of Suicide Events (the CASE Approach).

The highly acclaimed CASE Approach developed by Dr. Shawn Christopher Shea has been described by David Jobes Ph.D., a former President of the American Association of Suicidology, as follows: “The CASE Approach moves the clinician almost imperceptibly into the secret internal workings of the mind and soul of the patient tormented by suicidal ideation. I believe that the CASE Approach is a remarkable conceptual and clinical contribution to the field of suicidology. It should be taught to any front-line clinician. It has the power to meaningfully save lives.”

Goal:  Review the Chronological Assessment of Suicide Events as an approach for suicide risk assessment for middle and high school - age youth

Objectives:  At the end of this training the learner will be able to:

  1. Recognize and be able to utilize the following five techniques for increasing validity: the behavioral incident, shame attenuation, gentle assumption, symptom amplification, and denial of the specific.
  2. Utilize flexible strategies for weaving the above five validity techniques into effective methods of uncovering suicidal ideation, plans and actions while maintaining a powerful engagement.
  3. Apply the CASE Approach to uncover hidden suicidal ideation and actions.

Post Traumatic Stress Management Training and Psychological First Aid With Ethnocultural, Gender and Developmental Specificity (PTSM)

Program Goal: The goal of this training is to enable trainees to respond to traumatic incidents and large scale disasters with evidence-based public health/mental health intervention protocols incorporating ethnocultural, gender and developmental specificity so that the majority of survivors are stabilized and/or referred appropriately within the first 72 hours of the incident or disaster occurring.

Training objectives:
  • Identify historical perspectives and responses to helping people who have experienced psychological trauma and the resulting traumatic stress including ethnocultural and gender variables
  • Describe Psychological First Aid (PFA)
  • Analyze the PFA’s 8 core functions
  • Compare theoretical models describing the subjective experiences of traumatic stress and resiliency in US adults, children, and various ethnocultural and diverse groups
  • Analyze physiological and biological reactions that may occur during a traumatic stress response with focus on ethnocultural variables
  • Design and conduct PFA and PTSM continuum of care protocols sensitive to diversity, gender, and developmental stages, and as applied to TLC-PTSM Incident Command.

Training Overview: PTSM is a model developed and tested extensively in the field over the last 10 years by Robert D. Macy, PhD. This PTSM training series includes the most current components of psychological first aid, psychosocial stabilization and resiliency enhancement. Attendees are taught the skills used to identify, stabilize and augment the psychosocial needs of children who have been exposed to life threatening events including traumatic loss from accidents, suicide, homicide, illness, and larger impact disasters.

Advanced PTSM in Suicide Response Protocols:

Goal: The goal of this training is to enable trainees to respond to a suicide with evidence-based public health/mental health intervention protocols incorporating ethnocultural, gender and developmental specificity.

  • Review the detailed literature by Madelyn Gould, PhD, regarding the epidemiology of suicide and the risk and protective factors associated with attempts and completions
  • Identify conditions and stigmatic issues arising from deaths caused by suicide
  • Apply suicide-specific protocols to PTSM group models: orientations, stabilizations, and coping groups through small group practice

Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR)

SPR is an evidence-informed modular approach to help children, adolescents, adults, and families in the months and years after a traumatic exposure including disasters and terrorism. This training is a two-day intensive seminar. SPR is designed to help survivors acquire skills to reduce ongoing stress and effectively cope with post-incident stresses and adversities. Principles and techniques of Skills for A Psychological Recovery meet four basic standards. They are: (1) consistent with research evidence on risk and resilience following trauma; (2) applicable and practical in field settings; (3) appropriate for developmental levels across the lifespan; and (4) culturally informed and delivered in a flexible manner.

Classroom Based Psychosocial Intervention (CBI) and Traumatic Incident Intervention (TII)

These evidenced-based protocols involve a series of highly structured expressive-behavioral activities. The aim of these activities is to significantly reduce traumatic stress reactions, anxiety, fear and depressed mood by allowing and guiding children to do what they do best: playing, learning and creative problem solving. To achieve these goals, the TII and CBI group leaders use psychoeducation, movement and dance, art or “silent stories”, drama, and cooperative games.

TII is a 3 session protocol for youth in grades K-5, and CBI is a 5 week, 15 session protocol for youth in grades 3-12. They were originated and continue to be developed by Dr. Macy and the Center for Trauma Psychology. Dr. Macy has successfully used these protocols in Haiti, Turkey, West Bank and Gaza, Israel, Jordan, Nepal, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Eritrea, Afghanistan, Sudan, Uganda, Burundi and the United States to assist with ongoing efforts to provide school, community and tribal based clinical and psychosocial interventions to care for youth exposed to psychological trauma resulting from suicide, homicide and gang violence, armed conflict, ethnic cleansing, displacement, terrorism, genocide, and natural disasters.